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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)
as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
? >> no. if you take a look at the gun laws we have, i don't even think president obama is proposing more gun laws. we have to make sure we enforce our laws. we have laws that aren't being properly enforced. but the best thing to help prevent violent crime in inner cities is to bring opportunity in inner cities. is to help teach people good discipline, good character. that is civil society. that's what charities and churches do to help one another make sure they can realize the value in one another. >> you can do that by cutting taxes? >> those are your words, not mine. >> thank you very much, sir. >> that was kind of strange. trying to stuff words in people's mouths? >> it it sounds like you're -- >> ryan folks putting the paper in front of the camera and everything. vice presidential nominee paul ryan getting annoyed in this interview with terry camp in flint, michigan. the campaign even after the interview was over still went out of their way to trash the reporter that paul ryan walked out of that interview on. the campaign given on the record quotes calling
and kelly stand on, a constitutional law attorney. welcome to you both. fred, i'm going to start with you. you might think that the court should rule in favor of the university of texas, which is fighting to keep these racial preferences. why is that? >> well, i'm not advocating one decision or another. if you look at supreme court questioning going back to 2000 and three race can be a factor in determining admission. in this case, i think for the university of texas, the majority of the students at the university of texas at intercampus if they are in the top 10% of their graduating class because of the way that the schools are set up. that leads to diversity. gerri: okay, all right, maybe. let's talk to kelly. you just said that justice should be blind and there may be more effective ways of getting some balance and student body than having the government come in and order that it do so. how is that? >> well, you know there are scenes that are considered socioeconomic. therefore, they are in different schools and university of texas has advocated that this is to help middle and upper cl
. >> that would become part of my agenda. hopefully reverse roe v. wade and law regarding abortion. >> cenk: okay, also the world's biggest hypocrite on abortion, shockingly it's the tea party guy. and then paul ryan, in an interview it gets con contentious. >> those are your words, not mine. >> thank you very much, sir. >> that was kind of strange. >> cenk: i'm also going to tell you the secret strategy that the republicans have before debates. it's called preemptive strike. i'll tell you exactly how to it works. and then this guy that i'm about to show you suchen answer believable jerk. he said he's going fire his employees if obama is reelected. >> i'm the owner of the largest time share company in the world. >> cenk: it only gets worse from there. elbow of the day later. and then of course, did i mention that we have mark hamill? go time. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> i'm in favor of pro-life policy. >> i will preserve and protect a woman's right. >> the justices of the supreme court reverse roe v. wade. >> a woman should be able to choose whether or not she wants an abortion. >> mitt romney is changi
panels and between the patient and doctor. that is something i do not agree with in our health-care law. that's one of the reasons i oppose it. these are times we have to look at what is best for everyone to have the best kind of health care they can have. i believe in preventive health care and let me just address one thing before -- let me digress for a second. i have never said i'm for privatizing social security or our medicare plans. that's clearly not my thing. congressman murphy knows that has to be honest about that. i will support continuing reform to social security and medicare simply prolong it for our generation. congressman murphy voted to take $716 billion of medicare to fund the affordable health care act. i don't think that is what we should do. we're there for than going to eventually did i those services to our seniors or hospitals or doctors who are going to take medicare patients. . it is being taken out of the pockets of drug industries and drug companies who are making billions of care for seniors. if you are going to be serious about reducing the rate of growth o
, university of texas was doing that, they have a law called the top 10% law which basically requires the school to admit the top 10% of high school students across the state. >> from any high school. >> from any high school across the state. so, this means that diversity on campus has increased enormously and actually is higher at about 25% than it was under racial preferences, at about 21%. and so, they were, they've put racial preferences on top of that. the question is whether this is necessary or appropriate. >> paul: since the gruter decision you had sandra day o'connor replaced by samuel alito and there could be a switch in the decision? >> certainly, and a good thing they are revisiting it, paul, because there's a growing body of evidence that racial preferences, not only don't help the intended beneficiary, which is poorer blacks, usually middle class kids, and might actually be hurting the kids who receive them and i say that, a mismatch of kids in schools. in california when they ended racial references, the black graduation rate increased and that's because more kids were
one said to make sure under the law women get equal pay for equal work. one voted down the line against it. one saw 40 million uninsured americans sitting in emergency ro rooms, the other says to let them sit there. that's "hardball" for now. thank you for being with us. "the ed show" starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" live from miami, florida. 28 days until the 2012 election. the polls are tightening and the youth vote in the state of florida could be the savior for the president in this state. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >>> we need you fired up. i love you back, but i need you voting. >> on the the last day for voter registration in ohio and florida and 15 other states, the president is pounding the stump as the romney lie tour continues. >> you have to scratch your head when the president talks about big bird. >> the state of the race. another billionaire ceo is threatening his employees to vote romney or else. >> i'm the ceo of the largest timeshare company in the world. >> you won't believe this story. >>> paul ryan pulls
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't know his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where
to this election. >>> paul ryan e gets honest on gun laws while the national rifle association continues to spread lies about the president's policies. we'll have all the details. >>> and as the polls shift after last week's debate, will we get fooled again by mitt romney's lies? we'll look at what a romney presidency would mean for americans. share your thoughts with us on facebook and twitter using @edshow. we're comi >>> welcome back to "the ed show." thanks for watching tonight. voter registration closed today in four key states including ohio and florida and for president obama to win a close election, he will need the youth vote the way he had in 2008. some of the students at the florida international university told us what this election means to them. >> i just feel like students should all get out here and go and see what each candidate has to say and really know what they are voting for because this plays a big part in our lives. >> students have are having a hard time paying for school so voting is important for education purposes. >> i don't think cutting taxes or preking the wealthy i
gun laws. we have make sure we have enforce our laws. we need to make sure we enforce the laws. best way to prevent violent crime in the cities is bring opportunity. >> that is all they are releasing. too many people are making about the fact that paul ryan was about to stop to the interview. we have verb batum of what happened next. >> gretchen: the reporter and they were talking about gun violence in the inner city and paul ryan said bringing opportunity. >>> and you can do that with cutting taxes with a big tax cut. >> paul ryan said those are your word and not mine thampts kind of strange are you trying to stuff words in people's mouths. this was a local affiliate out of flint, michigan. an important state. >> brian: especially the polls are closing to within three. and it is interesting that paul ryan is out giving interviews and vice-president biden is in a six day -- c>> steve: no kidding. good for paul ryan stick to the press. the guy had something in mind. and it is the thing that newt gingrich did and was effective. maybe joe biden should be looking for that paul ryan. >> g
still need this law. that is really unfortunate. host: willie in jacksonville, florida. independent. caller: good morning. with the lady that just called -- my thing is there must not be enough highly educated black institutions for black folks to keep saying i have to go to harvard to get my education, to stanford or something like that. i just do not understand. being black, we do not have the professors, at least the same criteria. to me, it seems like we are no further than we were before. we're still trying to get an education at your school. 500 years, and we do not have no qualified school on the same level with these schools and professors that is on the same level? see what i'm saying? host: here is bill powers, the 28 president of the university of texas, writing in today's "wall street journal." "history repeats itself wednesday in an eerie but ironic way." host: in the opinion in 2003 that adam liptak referred to, that justice sandra day o'connor wrote that the constitution -- host: that is sandra day o'connor, writing back in 2003. from rockville center, new york, a rep
might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
because labor rolls -- rules. it is the epa and the laws. >> regulation. >> it is not just uncertainty. it is fear of the worst-case scenario coming down the pike. the worst-case scenario is that you do not do with this and their unbalanced tax system. you let the regulatory regime continue to squelch entrepreneurs. you don't take seriously our long-term energy needs and demands and create an affordable and reliable supply of north american energy. >> you fly right off the fiscal cliff. >> it was a shocking experience for a lot of people to go back a few months. the first time we hit the debt ceiling, all the seven whether you were a lender or somebody here who is proud of the way this country had managed to fair, all the sudden policy makers are running right at to the edge. you cannot pay your bills. there is nobody in business that would be allowed to walk away like that. what we're saying is that people in charge of both parties said it takes leadership and the execs -- in the executive branch. it takes leadership. the decisions have to be made. i see governors in both parties have
that the university of michigan law school, where they did use race in admission, had a lower level of -- they considered 14% to be a critical mass, much less than what the university of texas achieved through race-neutral means. i think this goes a long way to explaining why most observers think the supreme court is likely to strike down the use of race at the university of texas. the second question we take up, what should replace race-based affirmative action if it in fact is struck down by the u.s. supreme court? in a report, we look at nine states where, because of voter initiative or executive order or legislation, universities -- they did not give up on diversity and tried to find other ways of achieving racial and ethnic diversity. these plans were hardly perfect, but in many ways there are better than the old style of race-based affirmative action. you can see that in our analysis, six state street -- six states created partnerships with disadvantaged by schools to increase the pipeline of low- income and minority students. seven of the states provide class-based admission
. >> not a gun problem? >> no, if you look at gun laws i don't think even president obama is proposing more gun laws. we have good strong gun laws. >> not about gun laws. >> we have to enforce the laws. we have a lot of laws not properly enforced. we have to make sure we enforce the laws. best way to prevent violent crime in inner cities, bring opportunity to the inner cities. bring people out of poverty in the inner cities. teach people, good discipline. that is civil society, charities and civic groups and churches do to help one another make them realize they have value in one another. martha: that is when thing started to take a bit of a turn. gong man ryan ended interview rather abruptly. after this exchange. follow the reporter pushes him on tax cuts. you can do all by cutting taxes with a big tax cut? >> ryan respond, those are your words, not mine. off-camara ryan's press secretary was heard, thank you very much, sir. that's when paul ryan begins removing his mic and leaving, adding quote, that was trying to strange you're stuffing words in people's minds. >> i don't know if it is stran
to this election. just where is it? >>> paul ryan gets honest on gun laws while the national rifle association continues to spread lies about the president's policies. we'll have all the details. >>> and as the polls shift after last week's debate, will we get fooled again by mitt romney's lies? we'll look at what a romney presidency would mean for americans. share your thoughts with us on facebook and twitter using #edshow. we are coming right back. ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. like in a special ops mission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal collateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeting stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. trade architect. td ameritrade's empowering web-based trading platform. trade commission-free for 60 days, and we'll throw in up to $600
the constitution. the constitutional law could be used to interfere in any local decisions concerning local municipal unions. >> i call it the back in time amendment. because if you step back and look at this, it's not about collective bargaining, i've done collective bargaining with state employees and i believe it's protected in law and other fashions. this would literally go in and potentially wipe out up to 170 laws, on the books and take us back in time. again, this is a reaction to the reinvention of michigan, showing great progress and people don't like change in some cases. we need to get this proposal defeated in terms of moving forward with the state. stuart: it's that simple. if gets majority in the referendum, the vote in november. that changes the state constitution? >> that simple easy to do as that. >> that's one of the things we need to look at. we don't want to be some state that have ballot proposals, we have six different ballot proposals and the ads are misleading and i've been clear with people, and tell them how i'm going to vote. yes on proposal 1 and no on the rest a
protection under the law. >> we've recognized that there are some interests in diversity that are beneficial in the educational sphere. but we have said and we continue to say that is not an overriding consideration that has to be administered very narrowly because it's an odious and dangerous classification. >> ifill: but university president bill powers argued that concern is trumped by the need for a diverse student body. >> we believe the educational benefits of diversity are so important that they're worth fighting for all way to the united states supreme court. our lawyers this morning effectively made the case to the justices that diversity-- ethnic and otherwise-- benefits all of the students on our campus. >> ifill: the high court last visited the issue in 2003, deciding five to four to let the university of michigan law school could use race as one factor in its admissions process. before then, the university of texas guaranteed acceptance for the top 10% of students at every high school in the state. but after the michigan decision, texas and other schools added race as a factor f
of scapegoating officers. >>> oakland mayor said the majority of officers obey the law and protect the city but called the chief's recommendations fair and balanced. >> because the complaints are wide ranging from covering up your badge, not having your camera on, actually hurting somebody. it's a wide range. >> she said the city plans to have a ruling on all complaints by october 25th which is the deadline required by state law. >> we have new information about a police standoff in holster. around 3:40 the stand off outside the home ended peacefully. it started yesterday afternoon when a man barricaded himself inside a house. just before midnight the swat team moved in to the area, active negotiations started about an hour later. police say no shots were fired and the suspect is a person of interest in the case of a missing mother. 25-year-old heather carroll was last seen wednesday morning after dropping her child off at school. early thursday her car was found on fire. her parents say the man involved was a friend of their daughter and was in her wedding. police say she wasn't inside
, this man returned to new york to continue his law practice. he also acted in american express commercials. oh, wow. i was going to show you a little bit. actually, let's take a little bit of a look. but steve kornacki may know. >> do you know me? i ran for vice president of the united states in '64. so i shouldn't have troublie charging a meal, should i? with this, they treat me as though i had won. >> william miller. >> steve kornacki knows william miller. when we sit around in nerdland and think about this, oh, this is the one that nobody can get. of course, william miller. of course it is. >>> which unsuccessful vp candidate returned to serve as governor for 264 days before stepping down. >> sarah palin. >> very good. although there is a weird gender coherence thing going on. being, it was sarah palin. she remained governor of alaska for almost nine month before becoming the world's biggest facebooker updater. >> there was at least a while in this race a question whether or not she was going to be in the hat for the vp. but no. not this time. okay. next question. which losing vice pres
court to reinstate a new law that cuts off the final three days of early voting. an appeals court blocks the law pushed through by state republicans. as romney continues to campaign in ohio, president obama is back in the white house this morning. nbc's tracie pots joins us now with all the latest from washington, tracie, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. good morning, everyone. the president is closing the gap in a number of these battleground states and it continues to say the $5 trillion tax cut romney's proposing would add to the deficit and romney insists it is absolutely not true. >> if he says it's not true, then it's not true. okay. >> reporter: in battleground ohio, president obama insists mitt romney's tax cuts will add $5 trillion to the tax cuts. >> if it's true it's not going to add to the deficit, that leaves only one option. that's asking middle class families to foot the bill. >> the president's charge of a $5 trillion tax cut is obviously inaccurate and wrong. >> reporter: romney also in ohio mocked the obama campaign's latest add to cut funding for pbs. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)

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